Meet the ‘sorcerer’ and her ‘apprentice’ – just two of CABI’s trailblazing female scientists

To mark the UN’s International Day of Women and Girls in Science  we take a look at how two generations of female scientists are coming together to tackle non-native invasive weeds and help reduce environmental degradation Meet the ‘sorcerer’ and her ‘apprentice’ Dr Carol Ellison, a plant pathologist at CABI, and Project Scientist and PhD…
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“The future for women (in science) is ours to conquer”

To mark the forthcoming UN International Day of Women and Girls in Science (11 February 2019), we speak to some of CABI’s women working in science. In this blog Catherine Mloza Banda, a Development Communications Specialist – Invasive Species Management, reveals the motivation and inspiration behind her career in science communications and says ‘the future for women (in science)…
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“I was and still am motivated by discoveries and surprises that come with science”

  To mark the forthcoming UN International Day of Women and Girls in Science (11 February 2019), we speak to some of CABI’s women working in science. In this blog Lucy Karanja, a Content Manager, reveals the motivation and inspiration behind her career in science communications and says ‘women are all round scientists naturally’.  What motivated…
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Can a ‘diet’ of digital data really help feed the world?

Last week (29 January 2019) CABI was awarded a $1.49 million grant from the Gates Foundation to work with them to help increase food security in India and Ethiopia through better access to data on soil health, agronomy and fertilizers.  In this blog Communications Manager Wayne Coles looks at whether or not the use of…
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A planetary health diet: kind to your body, animals and the planet

By Jennifer Cole, Royal Holloway, University of London It has long been clear that certain foods and dietary choices are not good for human health, but there is now increasing evidence that they can also be bad for the health of the planet. The recently published Food in the Anthropocene: EAT-Lancet Commission on healthy diets…
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What’s it like doing a PhD with CABI?

In this Q&A article we hear from three PhD students who have collectively spent over 11 years studying at the CABI Switzerland centre in Delémont working with scientists there to improve the monitoring and management of invasive species in Europe and Africa. Find out from Judith Stahl, Benno Augustinus and Theo Linders about what they…
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The twelve pests of Christmas (trees)

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Is parthenium weed allergy problem worse than that of annual ragweed?

By Asad Shabbir Parthenium weed and annual ragweed are closely related members of the Asteraceae, known for their high allergenicity. The detrimental effects on human health of the more temperate annual ragweed are very well known. However, those of the more tropical parthenium weed are less well known and in fact much more severe, affecting…
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Tuning into radio to dispel myths

By Amzath Fassassi – SciDev.Net’s regional coordinator for sub-Saharan Africa French, and the driving force behind Science et Développement. In Africa, many communities are still unaware of the key principles of science, whether they relate to diseases or natural phenomena. Until the beginning of the 1980s, in the slums of my native Benin, I remember that when lightning, hitherto considered…
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Giving garlic mustard the biocontrol treatment

In eastern North America a species of weed has become an aggressive invader. Garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) is one of the most rapidly increasing woodland invasive plant species, spreading across northeastern and midwestern USA and southeastern Canada at a rate of nearly 2,500 square miles per year. The plant was most likely introduced to North…
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