Ceremony held to launch project to improve Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) capacity in Afghanistan

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Trade is a basic component of economic development and a major portion of development assistance comes under ‘aid for trade’. However, trade brings risks as food shipment can transport insects and diseases threatening agricultural production, human and animal health.
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CABI to liaise with MAIL and PPQD for improving Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) capacity in Afghanistan

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Agriculture has traditionally dominated Afghanistan’s economy as it accounts for the source of livelihood of 70% of the country’s population.  In 2019, Afghanistan recorded a share amount of 401910.25 million AFN (~$5,216.24 million USD) from the agriculture sector in GDP, highlighting the potential of this sector to uplift the country’s economy.
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Improved Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) system for Afghanistan: Need of the hour

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The World Trade Organization (WTO) is the international organization that deals with trade rules between nations. The key function of the WTO is to make sure that trade flows as smoothly as possible between its member countries. In addition, the WTO provides a platform for treaties to reduce trade barriers and contribute to economic growth…
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Building capacity for greater food security in Pakistan

As part of CABI’s mission to help farmers grow more and lose less, we have been funded by USAID – via the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) – to help Pakistan improve its sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) systems and therefore open up its fruit and vegetables to more high-end global markets that were previously untapped. Currently these products only contribute 13% of the country’s export but improvements to its SPS capabilities could see this number rise significantly.
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EU ban on mango imports highlights importance of phytosanitary certification

A ban on imports of mangoes from India to the EU is likely to cause dramatic losses to Indian growers and has produced an outcry amongst growers in India and retailers in the UK. The ban on importing mangoes from India came into effect today 1 May and will continue until 31 December 2015 –…
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