One Health working will improve health and well-being of us all: plant, animal, human and ecosystem!

   P1080980
    Pastoralists, Mongolia. Image courtesy of Esther Schelling, Swiss TPH.

 One of a series of blogs written by CABI editors for One Health Day on November 3rd 2016
 
It's always nice to meet up with a CABI author at a conference especially when they are giving a talk around a theme dear to CABI‘s heart,  namely “One Health”: the concept of working across the interface of animal, plant, human  and environment  to achieve health  & development  which is sustainable and fair. CABI has been gathering, managing and generating research information across all these sectors since 1912.  We know “its all connected”.

The conference was the RSTMH biennial meeting [Cambridge UK, Sept 12-16th, 2016], and the author in question, Esther Schelling, co-editor  of CABI’s  book One Health: The Theory and Practice of Integrated Health Approaches [2015].    To read a  free e-chapter, use this link.

In One Health beyond early detection and control of zoonoses Esther talked about her long-time project with nomadic pastoralists in Chad and a rift valley fever (RVF) control project in Kenya.  She drew attention to the need for:

  • more interdisciplinary studies to include an evaluation of One Health working
  • involvement of social scientists
  • engagement of key stakeholders

And tellingly she provided a cost-benefit analysis to society of controlling zoonoses when the disease is in its animal host before it infects human beings. 

Those cost-benefit analyses made a deep impression on the delegates, many of whom were involved in zoonotic neglected tropical diseases. Perhaps for the first time they were appreciating the added benefits and synergies that a transdisciplinary approach between science, society, humanities and medicine could bring.

Continue reading

EU dairy industry outlook following the abolition of milk quotas

By Miroslav Djuric, DVM, CAB International, Wallingford, UK.

Milk is the EU's number one agricultural product in terms of value, accounting for approximately 15% of agricultural output with approximately 148 million tonnes of cow milk produced in 2014. The dairy sector is also of significant economic and social importance in the EU, with over 650,000 specialised dairy farmers,almost 18 million dairy cows and 1.2 million people engaged in dairying  (Eurostat census 2010).  Cow-809644_640

The EU milk supply was managed for more than 30 years by the EU milk quota system which expired on 1 April 2015. This system provided a national quota and an individual quota fixed for each producer or purchaser, with a penalty (‘superlevy') payable by individual farmers and countries who exceeded their quotas.

Milk-933106_640

Continue reading

7,500 Years of Cheese Making in Europe

M Djuric, Dairy Science Editor

Compelling evidence of cheese-making has been uncovered in prehistoric pottery sieves found in the Kuyavia region in Poland by researchers from Great Britain, Poland and the United States. The study has just been published online in Nature journal on 12 December 2012.

DairycowAn abundance of milk fats was detected in these specialized pottery vessels, comparable in form to modern cheese strainers, suggesting that humans have been making cheese in Europe for at least 7,500 years.  There is a possibility that cheese was made even at earlier times using other materials such as cloth or wooden cheese strainers, but these materials are more perishable and difficult to detect as archeological material.

Continue reading

Global Milk Production Increasing at Fast Pace

By Miroslav Djuric, Editor (Dairy Science Abstracts)

Global milk production in 2012 is forecast to reach 760 million tonnes, according to a new report published in the Food Outlook by the United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO). This would represent an annual increase of 3%, largely due to the increased production in Asia, Oceania and South America.

DairybIn Asia, milk production is expected to record strong growth in India, China, Pakistan and Turkey, mainly in response to growing domestic demand for dairy products. In India, the world’s largest milk producing country, milk production in 2012 is forecast to rise by 5 million tonnes to 132 million tonnes compared with the previous year. Herd size expansion, rather than rising productivity, is the principal reason behind the rise in India’s milk production, where more than 55% of the total milk production comes from buffaloes.

In Oceania, an increase in herd size in New Zealand combined with favourable weather conditions and prolonged period of high prices for dairy products is expected to result in a staggering growth rate of 9% compared with the previous year. A growth rate of 4% is expected in Australia.

Continue reading

F is for….

Firefighters…fishermen…or farmers? What do you think these three groups of professionals might have in common? All of them save lives, of course. Or they could be doing, as a result of new data presented yesterday in a satellite symposium held as part of the Nutrition Society’s 2008 Summer Meeting.

Experts meeting to discuss the latest research findings from the Lipgene1 project, explored the need to improve people’s intakes of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, also often known as omega-3 fatty acids2 in order to prevent all the suffering, death and public expense caused by coronary heart disease each year. Importantly, they also shared data on how those intakes could be improved, almost without us being aware of it.

Continue reading